Celtic Knot

      The landscape, culture, and history of Tennessee is both an accumulation of the peoples who have lived on it and a reflection of the society which brought it into being. The past endures in land parcels, transportation routes, architecture, cemeteries, rail lines, stone fences, nearly-deserted cross-roads communities, and archeological sites. For most of its two hundred years of settlement, Tennessee was defined by single-family farms and small communities. This arrangement of co-existent farms and villages, and the culture and society that ultimately originated within that framework, is attributed in large part to the scores of immigrants from the counties of what is now, primarily, Northern Ireland who entered the Cumberland Valley in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Among the wave of hundreds of thousands of Ulster Scots and Irish who crossed into what would become Tennessee in 1796 was Hugh Rogan of Glentown, an area along the border of Counties Donegal and Tyrone. His story and his legacy bridges more than two centuries of culture and history between Sumner County, Tennessee and County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

Celtic Knot

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